Tag Archives: just

Insanity: CISPA Just Got Way Worse, And Then Passed On Rushed Vote

Up until this afternoon, the final vote on CISPA was supposed to be tomorrow. Then, abruptly, it was moved up today—and the House voted in favor of its passage with a vote of 248-168. But that’s not even the worst part.

The vote followed the debate on amendments, several of which were passed. Among them was an absolutely terrible change (pdf and embedded below—scroll to amendment #6) to the definition of what the government can do with shared information, put forth by Rep. Quayle. Astonishingly, it was described as limiting the government’s power, even though it in fact expands it by adding more items to the list of acceptable purposes for which shared information can be used. Even more astonishingly, it passed with a near-unanimous vote. The CISPA that was just approved by the House is much worse than the CISPA being discussed as recently as this morning.

Previously, CISPA allowed the government to use information for “cybersecurity” or “national security” purposes. Those purposes have not been limited or removed. Instead, three more valid uses have been added: investigation and prosecution of cybersecurity crime, protection of individuals, and protection of children. Cybersecurity crime is defined as any crime involving network disruption or hacking, plus any violation of the CFAA.

Basically this means CISPA can no longer be called a cybersecurity bill at all. The government would be able to search information it collects under CISPA for the purposes of investigating American citizens with complete immunity from all privacy protections as long as they can claim someone committed a “cybersecurity crime”. Basically it says the 4th Amendment does not apply online, at all. Moreover, the government could do whatever it wants with the data as long as it can claim that someone was in danger of bodily harm, or that children were somehow threatened—again, notwithstanding absolutely any other law that would normally limit the government’s power.

Read more: http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20120426

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“I Think Ron Paul Just Won Iowa!” Rachel Maddow April 23, 2012


Ron Paul wins Iowa! Ron Paul wins Minnesota! What other states will Ron Paul win after the dust settles?

The Ron Paul delegate strategy:
http://www.dailypaul.com/228193/tell-the-truth-youve-doubted

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It’s not just Rush: Occupy WAll Street says 98 advertisers now fleeing from all right wing radio shows

Rush Limbaugh gave the right wing talk radio industry juice, and he just might be the cause of its demise. 98 advertisers so far have jumped ship from Rush Limbaugh’s show and other right wing stations due to the fallout from his 4 day long misogynistic attack on a Georgetown coed.


Daily Beast reports on Occupy Wall Street, “There are already tangible signs that the three dozen national and local advertisers that have pulled their ads from The Rush Limbaugh Show are having a financial impact.”

Premiere Networks distributes Limbaugh as well as a host of other right-wing talkers — they quickly sent an email out to its affiliates early Friday.

Think Progress reports:

Premiere Networks is circulating a list of 98 advertisers who want to avoid “environments likely to stir negative sentiments.”The list includes carmakers (Ford, GM, Toyota), insurance companies (Allstate, Geico, Prudential, State Farm) and restaurants (McDonald’s, Subway). As you’ll see in the note below, those “environments” go beyond the Rush Limbaugh show

Read more: http://freakoutnation.com/2012/03/10/its-not-just

UPDATE from Premier Radio: It’s not just Rush. Sponsors want their ads off of the likes of Mark Levin, Rush Limbaugh, Tom Leykis, Michael Savage, Glenn Beck, Sean Hannity.

Read: http://www.radio-info.com/news/when-it-comes-to-advertisers

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SOPA was just shelved! Now to defeat PIPA

Misguided efforts to combat online privacy have been threatening to stifle innovation, suppress free speech, and even, in some cases, undermine national security. As of yesterday, though, there’s a lot less to worry about.

At issue are two related bills: the Senate’s Protect IP Act and the even more offensive Stop Online Piracy Act in the House, both of which are generated intense opposition from tech giants and First Amendment advocates. The first sign that the bills’ prospects were dwindling came Friday, when SOPA sponsors agreed to drop a key provision that would have required service providers to block access to international sites accused of piracy.

The legislation ran into an even more significant problem yesterday when the White House announced its opposition to the bills. Though the administration’s chief technology officials officials acknowledged the problem of online privacy, the White House statement presented a fairly detailed critique of the measures and concluded, “We will not support legislation that reduces freedom of expression, increases cybersecurity risk or undermines the dynamic, innovative global Internet.” It added that any proposed legislation “must not tamper with the technical architecture of the Internet.”

Until now, the Obama administration had not taken a position on the issue. The response was published yesterday as part of the online “We The People” petition initiative launched by the White House last year. Occupy Wall Street is pleased.

Read more: http://www.washingtonmonthly.com/political-animal

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