Banker’s Insulting Waitress Tip Incites Class Warfare Between the 1% and the 99%

Just when you may have thought the ongoing battle between the 99% and the 1% was dying down, it may have been reignited. A wealthy banker left a $1.33 tip on a $133 lunch at the True Food Kitchen restaurant in Newport Beach, California.

To add insult to injury the word “tip” was circled on the receipt, and the banker wrote “get a real job” on the bill. The picture of the receipt was taken and uploaded to the blog Future Ex-Banker by a person who was dining with the anonymous banker. As expected, the blog received a lot of attention and has now been taken down. The author of the blog wrote, “mention the 99% in my boss’ presence and feel his wrath. So proudly does he wear his 1% badge of honor that he tips exactly 1% every time he feels the server doesn’t sufficiently bow down to his holiness.”

People online who had a chance to see the blog post before it went offline and those who have been made aware of it on social media outlets are outraged. One person called the tip a “tale of greed and contempt,” and another referred to it as “arrogance personified.” The Web’s general reaction to this story is eerily similar to an almost identical 1% vs. 99% scenario that took place last fall. In Washington state, a waitress received a tip of no money and advice scrawled on the receipt that told her she could “stand to lose a few pounds.”

I know I’m supposed to represent Occupy Wall Street here and a story like this normally would enrage me, but personally… I think it’s a hoax.  Something just to stir up trouble and get people talking.  Though, if the people are talking that is great. So maybe something good can come out of this.

Read more and watch video:
http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/trending-now/banker-insulting

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2 Responses to Banker’s Insulting Waitress Tip Incites Class Warfare Between the 1% and the 99%

  1. I have worked many years in restaurants. Some customers are just plain mean. The story sounds real to me. The more important the customer thinks they are the more likely they will be difficult. I remember my manager at a diner warning us when bigwigs came in.

  2. Its such as you learn my thoughts! You seem to know so much about this, like you wrote the book in it or something. I feel that you simply could do with a few percent to drive the message house a bit, however other than that, this is great blog. A fantastic read. I’ll certainly be back.

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